Given: A Give & Take Novel (Book 3)

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His writing is as engaging and enjoyable as his style in the classroom. With page-turning stories and compelling studies, Give and Take reveals the surprising forces behind success, and the steps we can take to enhance our own. Grant shows us the importance of nurturing and encouraging prosocial behaviors. Well-researched, generous, actionable and important. Adam Grant has given us a gift, a hard-hitting book about the efficacy of connection and generosity in everything we do. Unfortunately in America, we have too often succumbed to the worldview that if everyone behaved in their own narrow self-interest, all would be fine.

Adam Grant shows us with compelling research and fascinating stories there is a better way. En route you will find yourself re-examining your own life. Read it yourself, then give copies to the people you care most about in this world. Adam Grant offers a captivating window into innovative principles that drive effectiveness at every level of an organization and can immediately be put into action.


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Along with being a fascinating read, this book holds the key to a more satisfied and productive workplace, better customer relationships, and higher profits. It will create a society in which people do better by being better. Read the book and change the way you live and work. Adam Grant delivers a triple treat: stories as good as a well-written novel, surprising insights drawn from rigorous science, and advice on using those insights to catapult ourselves and our organizations to success. By introducing us to highly-impressive individuals, he proves that, contrary to popular belief, the best way to climb to the top of the ladder is to take others up there with you.

Give and Take presents the road to success for the 21st century. Grant presents an evidence-based case for the counterintuitive link between generosity and finishing first. He has won every distinguished research award and teaching award in his field, and his work has changed the way that people see the world. If you want to be surprised—very pleasantly surprised—by what really drives success, then Give and Take is for you. If you want to make the world a better place, read this book.

If you want to make your life better, read this book. Give and Take helps readers understand how to maximize their effectiveness and help others simultaneously. It will serve as a new framework for both insight and achievement. A must read! Join Reader Rewards and earn your way to a free book!

Join Reader Rewards and earn points when you purchase this book from your favorite retailer. Read An Excerpt. Paperback —. Add to Cart Add to Cart. Also by Adam Grant. Always keeping a mental score.

More Books by Kelli Maine

Givers - More willing to see the potential in everyone and try and bring out the best in people. Get immense satisfaction out of helping others. Give for the satisfaction of helping others. Great quote: "If you're going to get tens of millions of people using your software, you really should do something meaningful, something that changes the world. Dormant ties - we all have people who we used to see or know well but have since lost contact with them. A study by Daniel Levin, Jorge Walter, and Keith Murnighan, found that people who are "dormant ties" are valuable contacts for advice.

Over the past few years, while they were out of touch, they had been exposed to new ideas and perspectives. Giving can be contagious - it's possible to cultivate a culture of giving in a group as people in a group look to others for clues about appropriate behavior. When you invest your expertise or connections in someone, it encourages them to try and do the same to others. It's not transactional - you don't have to give back to exactly the same person, just to the group.

Also, "studies show that, on average, from sales teams to paper mill crews to restaurants, the more giving group members do, the higher the quantity and quality of their groups' products and services. Because their teachers were told they had high potential. When teachers believed their students were bloomers, they set high expectations for their success. As a result, the teachers engaged in more supportive behaviors that boosted the students' confidence and enhanced their learning and development.

Teachers communicated more warmly to the bloomers, gave them more challenging assignments, called on them more often, and provided them with more feedback. Look for people with talent but focus on whether they have high motivation and work ethic. Givers tend to have the belief that everyone could be a potential bloomer and so they are worth investing time and energy in. Sunk cost - there's more to why people continue to invest in something when it's no longer smart to keep investing. Three other factors are involved: 1 Anticipated regret Will I be sorry if I didn't give this another chance?

I want to prove that I'm right and they are wrong. Takers are more susceptible to falling for this. Persuasion "By asking people questions about their plans and intentions, we increase the likelihood that they actually act on these plans and intentions. Because our answers have been influenced by ourselves. One caveat is that the plans and intentions have to be for desirable actions. Which probably explains why asking my sons "When are you planning to clean your room?

Seeking advice is a good way to influence people. Apparently, people seeking advice are rated more favorably by their bosses than those who never seek advice and help. Studies demonstrate that across the manufacturing, financial services, insurance, and pharmaceuticals industries, seeking advice is among the most effective ways to influence peers, superiors, and subordinates. First one is obvious, you find out new info. Second one is that in order for someone to answer your question, they have to look at the problem from your point of view change their perspective. If they come up with a solution and have also giving some of their time, energy, or knowledge to help you think something through , that often leads to them being committed to helping you achieve it third benefit.

But if you genuinely need advice and are worried about asking for it, the benefits above should convince you to reach out. How to avoid 'giving burnout' 1. Set boundaries and pack your giving into set times so you can conserve your energy and focus. Make sure that the giving provides satisfaction for you too. Do you feel energized by it?

Or are you doing something out of a sense of duty? Watch out for takers! They are masters are getting givers to give too much. Find your tribe "We gravitate toward people, places, and products with which we share an uncommon commonality. On the other hand, we want to stand out: we search for uniqueness, differentiation, and individuality.

As we navigate the social world, these two motives are often in conflict. The more strongly we affiliate with a group, the greater our risk of losing our sense of uniqueness. The more we work to distinguish ourselves from others, the greater our risk of losing our sense of belongingness.


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  • Give And Take Summary!

One way to do that is to join a group with shared interests, identities, goals, etc. Hello Goodreads! These are the groups in which we take the most pride, and feel the most cohesive and valued. Dec 14, Sabita rated it it was ok. The concept is good in that it tries to prove that givers are ultimately more successful than takers. However the numerous examples that are used to prove the same point again and again is extremely off putting. He has commented on how givers should avoid being taken advantage of, but the pearls of wisdom are interspersed with boring examples, so making it difficult to cut to the chase.

Apr 06, Sara Alaee rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , psychology. In traditional old-school reciprocity, people operated like matchers, trading value back and forth with one another. We helped the people who helped us, and we gave to the people from whom we wanted something in return. But today, givers like Adam Rifkin are able to spark a more powerful form of reciprocity. Instead of trading value, Rifkin aims to add value. His giving is governed by a simple rule: the five-minute favor.

His research examinations reveal that in professional settings people act as either takers, givers or matchers. Matchers stand somewhere in between. Matchers operate on the principle of fairness: when they help others, they protect themselves by seeking reciprocity. However, when it comes to work, we think we have to focus on our own interests. We believe that those who combine motivation and ability with a good share of self-opportunism will rise to the top of the success ladder faster, stronger and more profitable.

In other words, takers are the winners. Now, the important question is: Is it always true? Well … not according to Mr. You might ask how? Or why? Before closing this review, I'd like to first introduce you to a website: www. You can also invite people in your network to rate your reciprocity style And finally, here is one of my most favorite picks from the book, which is an advice from Mr. Instead of worrying about getting sucked into extremely time-consuming acts of helping and giving, you should look for ways to add high value to others, at a low personal cost. View all 4 comments.

Apr 19, Andrea McDowell rated it it was amazing Shelves: business. A lovely antidote to any cynicism you may have about who succeeds in business and life, and maybe a gentle nudge for anyone most concerned with getting what they can to give a little, too. Grant is a business professor who has studied the career and life trajectories of people he labels givers, takers, matchers and fakers. Fakers being those people who have taker values, but try to seem like givers to higher-ups and powerful people to create good impressions and get the rewards of being generous A lovely antidote to any cynicism you may have about who succeeds in business and life, and maybe a gentle nudge for anyone most concerned with getting what they can to give a little, too.

Fakers being those people who have taker values, but try to seem like givers to higher-ups and powerful people to create good impressions and get the rewards of being generous without the costs. I was surprised to learn that while givers did indeed congregate at the bottom of the career and salary ladders, they also congregated at the top, basically forming a sandwich around the takers and matchers in the middle. What explains this counter-intuitive result?

Givers, when they manage to give a lot without letting themselves get burned out or taken advantage of, create large networks of friends and allies and excellent reputations that work to their long-term advantage, whereas takers--even when they manage to create short-term giver reputations--end up with their selfish actions coming back later to ruin their reputations and destroy their networks and relationships.

Taken By Storm: A Give & Take Novel (Book 2)

Give and Take is another black eye for the Greed Is Good philosophy, and the more the better in my opinion. Grant solidly establishes that not only is Greed bad for society, greedy workers are bad for the companies they work for, greedy leaders lead their teams to disaster, and greedy people end up shooting themselves in the foot over the long term.

It's better to give, in every way that can be measured, so long as you don't let yourself be taken advantage of--and he's got plenty of research establishing how successful givers manage to do just that. Regardless of whether or not you personally care about who is more successful givers vs. Jul 07, Leo Polovets rated it it was amazing. I thought this book was terrific. The gist is that there are three kinds of people in this world: - takers -- those who selfishly exploit every situation to their advantage - givers -- those who give to others without much regard for themselves - matchers -- those who play a tit-for-tat game and match the giving styles of the people they deal with i.

The author claims that while it seems like takers would b I thought this book was terrific. The author claims that while it seems like takers would be at the top of the world, it turns out that givers are more likely to be found there. It also turns out that givers are more likely to be other people's doormats -- no surprise there.

Takers and matchers tend to achieve an average amount of success while givers find themselves living in the extremes. The author provides anecdotes and some research to back up his assertions, and also offers plenty of recommendations for becoming a successful giver. Apr 08, Colin Gunderson rated it it was amazing. This book is excellent. It highlights the power and joy in giving. While I appreciate and respect this work because of the good it should spread, the main point in giving is not to get ahead or be more successful. The point of giving is simply to do the right thing.

Aug 04, Sean Goh rated it really liked it. Short-sighted networking: -only with those who you perceive can be of use matchers -receivers feel manipulated takers Strong ties are bonds, weak ties are bridges. Pronoia VS Paranoia People are out to help you Dormant ties strong ties that drifted provide more novel insights. Make it a norm to add values Success is only portable when the team moves. Chunking giving - concentrate your giving efforts to reduce the net interruption impacts they have on your work Giving as a meaningful, enjoyable choice, rather than a duty or obligation.

Do not confuse agreeableness with compassion. Advocate by seeing yourself as negotiating for your best friend instead, or remind yourself of who is dependent on you. Aim to understand your counterparty's interests grow the pie Remember: You're not the only one who can help. Find unique common ground. We underestimate the tendency of others to help and give. Takers do good to look good. Jan 07, Vipul Murarka rated it it was amazing. For me this book was groundbreaking. It is second of the top five books I will recommend after Blink by Malcolm Gladwell to everyone to read.

Prof Grant has termed them as givers. The book is laded with examples from numerous fields such as business, startup, publishing, movies, legal, sports and many more. Prof Grant will make sure you stay glued to th For me this book was groundbreaking. Prof Grant will make sure you stay glued to this book until you finish it.

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His theories, backed up by research and woven into story-telling is something that will not only make the reading simple and fun but also will teach you a lot in its unique way. The book wonderfully argues why givers tend to be at the top of success ladder and the theories backed by real-life examples that are mentioned make sense and can be applied in life. Givers tend to create large network of friends and acquaintances because of their giving attitude and that benefits them in one way or the other in long term.

He has also highlighted how not to become a doormat while you are constantly giving and that is something that everyone will be willing to understand. Also, the book has a lot of interesting things that are happening in the world such as Kiva and many others which make the book even more addictive. The book is written in very simple English so that everyone can read it.

Give and Take by Adam Grant | ybotumafar.tk: Books

The research that must have been done for this book is commendable. You will fall in love with Prof Grant and his ideas even if you havent met him. Give and Take reads like any Malcolm Gladwell's and should be read by everyone from all walks of life. Had some interesting and inspirational anecdotes, part of which resonated with my own experience.

Also had a few nice ideas that seem worth trying out, e. Main criticisms: felt that at times, the book was bending a bit too much to take whatever perspective ended up painting "givers" as the best group of people. Also saw some claims which I felt weren't entirely supported by the state of existing research. Much of the book also seemed to be built around anecdotes, as well as s Had some interesting and inspirational anecdotes, part of which resonated with my own experience.

Much of the book also seemed to be built around anecdotes, as well as studies that were old saw several which were from the s, when psychology's standards were even worse than what they are today , had small samples, or questionable methodology - for instance, I'm not convinced that counting people's number of LinkedIn connections is a good proxy for how connected they really are. Overall, it feels like the author was more motivated to tell a story that would motivate people to become "givers", than making a particularly rigorous argument in support of it.


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  7. I may try to give a similar summary at some point soon as well. Jan 02, Michael Slavin rated it it was amazing Shelves: business. This book explores how we give and take as the title implies. We are all a combination of givers, takers or matchers, but have a dominate preference. You already have a feel for this in your daily activities, but his helps to quantify it and shows you why you should strive to be more a giver who has there own long term interests at heart as they help the world.

    Excellent book. Aug 08, Alena rated it really liked it. I know I wouldn't have chosen to read this book if it hadn't been one of the summer reading options for my job, but I'm so glad I did. I just loved it. Grant's writing style, telling people's stories to illustrate his philosophy, was a perfect fit for me. There are studies and there are numbers, but it's definitely more about the stories. And, while I didn't find the concept of a world divided among givers, takers and matchers revolutionary, I did appreciate applying that philosophy to professiona I know I wouldn't have chosen to read this book if it hadn't been one of the summer reading options for my job, but I'm so glad I did.

    And, while I didn't find the concept of a world divided among givers, takers and matchers revolutionary, I did appreciate applying that philosophy to professional success. It's very different from the dog-eat-dog model we are surrounded with. This is an optimistic view of the world, and we all certainly need a bit of that these days. An easy and inspiring read. Read this book for the second time.

    Will probably do another read later in the year. The lessons never get old! Jun 25, Ernest rated it it was amazing Shelves: topread-in Many books aim to take a look at the world with a view to discerning some principles and ideas from successful people that others can apply. Few books manage to do this, combining being immensely readably with research and conclusions truly worth listening to, upon which would stem profound implications about the world we live in and the interactions we have with each other and that can have meaningful, lasting impacts.

    Wharton professor A Many books aim to take a look at the world with a view to discerning some principles and ideas from successful people that others can apply. The concept that some givers, those who contribute to others without expecting anything in return, turn out to be some of the most successful people is a strikingly counterintuitive notion in a world that commonly believes that success, especially business success, goes to those who strive to get as much as possible from others. For its life-changing insights, the ability to leave one thinking about why and how to act in the future long after the final page is turned and potential to truly have meaningful, lasting impacts, all within a researched framework in an engaging style, Give and Take is one of the most impactful books I have read.

    May 31, Daniel Taylor rated it it was amazing Shelves: business , self-help , foundational-self-help-books , career. As entrepreneurs, what kind of people do you think do best in business — the Givers, the Takers or the Matchers?

    Givers and Takers

    Most people, he says, expect that Takers will finish first. While some Givers do finish last, other Givers come ou As entrepreneurs, what kind of people do you think do best in business — the Givers, the Takers or the Matchers? While some Givers do finish last, other Givers come out on top. Takers and matchers settle in the middle. Grant presents his argument well. Grant reveals the mistakes Selfless Givers make that see them finish last, and explains why Otherish Givers win.

    Read this to be convinced of the need to become an Otherish Giver — and find a roadmap to get you there. May 23, Simon Eskildsen rated it really liked it. As with any business book with respect for itself, Give and Take uses a model to simplify the world: there are three different types of people: takers; who take more than they give, matchers; who give and take about equally by keeping score, and givers; who give more than they take.

    When you look at their performance, givers do worst, then takers, matchers, and finally givers again. Because if you only give without ever asking for help, you're off poorly. However, if you give and ask for he As with any business book with respect for itself, Give and Take uses a model to simplify the world: there are three different types of people: takers; who take more than they give, matchers; who give and take about equally by keeping score, and givers; who give more than they take.

    The givers were at a disadvantage—and the negative correlation between giver scores and grades was stronger than the effect of smoking on the odds of getting lung cancer. But that was the only year of medical school in which the givers underperformed. By their second year, the givers had made up the gap: they were now slightly outperforming their peers.

    By the sixth year, the givers earned substantially higher grades than their peers. These relationships are important. Often when people switch jobs, they underestimate how interdependent they are on their environment. Surgeons don't get better with practice, the hospital does. If you move the surgeon, they're back to performing however the next hospital does.

    When star analysts move in the financial world, they're less likely to be in the top of the new firms for five years. If they move with a teammate, they're more likely to be doing better. The book is jam-packed with humbling stories of people who push behind the scenes and make other people look amazing.

    One of the authors on Simpsons is legendary, but he didn't put his name on the episodes, he allowed the young hot-shots to do it—but he molded everything into great shape. There's also a lot of semi-random psychology the author seems to read every study under the sun , which I didn't mind since it was typically great. The other half of the time, the candidate had only average knowledge, getting 30 percent right.

    As expected, audiences favored the expert. But an interesting wrinkle emerged when the tape included a clumsy behavior by the candidate. But when the expert was clumsy, audiences liked him even more. Psychologists call this the pratfall effect. Spilling a cup of coffee hurt the image of the average candidate: it was just another reason for the audience to dislike him.

    But the same blunder helped the expert appear human and approachable—instead of superior and distant. Overall, enjoyable book. I picked it up after listening to a podcast with the author because I couldn't stop thinking about the 'giver and taker' terminology to describe behaviour going on around me. View all 3 comments. Apr 02, Aaron Arnold rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in , economics , science.

    It's structured like every other "improve your business performance in ten easy steps!!! Danger signs: - An extremely broad subject "giver" personalities" vs "matchers" or "takers", who aren't as generous to other people or are downright parasitical - Cutesy chapter titles goofy animal analogies like "The Peacock and the Panda", pseudo-paradoxes like "The Power of Powerless Communication", or bad puns like "Chump Change", which is about not being a doormat - Seemingly superficial rapid-fire transitions between evidence for the author's position for example, chapter 3, which is about the power of collaboration, jumps from comedy to architecture to coronary bypass surgery to equity analysts to the polio vaccine to temperature perception experiments to spinal taps to wedding registries - Inclusion of possibly irrelevant historical analogies is the trajectory of Abraham Lincoln's political career really a useful analogy for modern workplace interactions?

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    And yet, Grant makes it all work. Grant has lots of good case studies showing that while being helpful can sometimes backfire on you, such as if you're pathologically ignoring your own needs , helping people generates such positive mutual returns that, much like the evolutionary strategy of Generous Tit-for-Tat, as long as you look on the bright side of human nature you'll be surprised at how far you can go.

    It's completely fair to be skeptical of such Pollyanna-ish positivity, yet I feel like Grant is correct to advocate for trusting in other people. While I would love to have seen some more longitudinal evidence i. Wilson, who is quoted here, once had a good line that "Within a group, selfish individuals always win. But in contests between groups, groups of altruists always beat groups of selfish individuals.

    Context is everything when it comes to talking about human behavior, but even though it seems facile to link Teach For America and venture capital firms, Grant is very persuasive when he talks about the inspirational effects of helping people. No business book would be complete without action items. Here are his end-of-the-book bullet points: - Test your giver quotient by visiting his website to figure out if you're a giver, matcher, or taker - Run a reciprocity ring that encourages helpful interactions - Help other people craft their jobs - Start a love machine meaning try to institutionalize helpful feedback mechanisms in your organizations - Embrace the five-minute favor, because they cost you very little time but can be very helpful to the recipients - Practice powerless communication, and take advantage of the psychological loophole that makes people more likely to listen to you when they think you're not trying to lawyer them into something - Join a community of givers, and get inspired by them - Launch a personal generosity experiment - Seek help more often, because people enjoy doing favors for others more than they enjoy having favors done for them Aug 03, RitaSkeeter rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one who was mentally pigeonholing everyone they know into being a 'giver', 'matcher', or 'taker' while they read Grant details how awesome it is to be a giver, and that the most successful people are givers.

    However, the least successful people? They're givers too. To avoid being one of the doormat variety of givers , Grant discussed the need for givers to place boundaries around their giving to avoid burn out, and being used by the evil takers. Fair call.