The Rosetta Stone (Ancient Egyptian Mysteries Book 5)

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There are more than Hieroglyphic illustrations including Egyptian word examples and over hieroglyphs from the Gardiner list. Egyptian Hieroglyphics includes detailed information on the history of Egyptian writing and mathematics, the use of the different types of symbols, how to write your name, how to recognize kings names and the story of the scribe with a video showing how papyrus is made. Understanding hieroglyphs Learn to to recognise the names of pharaoh Photographic archive of hieroglyphs from Egypt All the content can be printed including typewriter and calculator functions.

The Hieroglyphic Typewriter and Math Calculator is included. The on screen QWERTY keyboard incorporates alphabet and number symbols together with a selection of determinative signs. The keys include Latin symbols together with their hieroglyph equivalents and descriptions, which allow you to type messages naturally and at a glance see the translations.

Check Out. Young was a physician, physicist, and all-around genius. Egyptology was one of his hobbies and he began studying the texts of the Rosetta stone in AD He correctly identified the cartouche, the oval loop containing hieroglyphs, as the name of King Ptolemy, by finding the corresponding name written in Greek. How the eventual solution was delayed by the perceived wisdom of the times--well told and compelling. The actual text is way less intriguing than the process of discovery.

DPL book Nov 10, Lou Babal rated it it was ok. I gave up on this one. I had to wonder if their and been any editing before publication. It just bounced all over the place without getting to the thread that could pull me through. Jul 31, fleegan rated it it was amazing Shelves: best-books-ever , non-fiction. This nonfiction book is about the Rosetta Stone as well as the gentlemen who found it, studied it, and solved it. It doesn't talk so much about Ancient Egypt as it does the Enlightenment and the Romantic periods because that's when the stone was found and those are the people who studied it.

The author makes the case that Young laid the founda This nonfiction book is about the Rosetta Stone as well as the gentlemen who found it, studied it, and solved it. The author makes the case that Young laid the foundation of solving Egyptian hieroglyphs while Champollion took them even further. The history of the stone is fascinating. It is a decree made by Pharoah, Ptolemy V Epiphanes thanking the priests and temples for helping him out during a period of revolt, and it's written in hieroglyphs which was considered the writing of the gods , Egyptian Demotic a kind of script used in document writing , and also in classical Greek.

It was Napoleon's men who found the stone first in the Egyptian city of The french were unearthing all kinds of ancient treasures while Napoleon invaded Egypt. Then along came Britain who took Egypt from France and also stole treasures, many of which sit in the British Museum today.

The discovery

What makes this book so great is the author, an englishman, writes so well. It's not a dull book at all. He has that dry british wit and he uses it quite a bit. The only part that was "meh" was the last little bit about who really owns the Rosetta Stone? Where should it reside? He goes on about should we give back all the treasures to the places they were found? But that if we do that we'll have to do that with everything, not just Egyptian stuff Then at the very end the author translates the stone for us.

The decree itself is kinda boring because it's the pharaoh going on and on and everytime he mentions himself it's not "I" or "me" it's something like "King Ptomlemy god manifest whose beneficience is perfect" and reading that over and over gets old. This made for a somewhat odd entry in the Wonders of the World series as the other books in the set all seem to be dedicated to significant historical buildings and structures whilst this one is dedicated to an object. The Rosetta Stone is certainly something which has had a fantastic impact on our understanding of the past, having provided the key to deciphering hieroglyphics which were previously impenetrable but I got the impression that there really is not all that much to say about it, whic This made for a somewhat odd entry in the Wonders of the World series as the other books in the set all seem to be dedicated to significant historical buildings and structures whilst this one is dedicated to an object.

The Rosetta Stone is certainly something which has had a fantastic impact on our understanding of the past, having provided the key to deciphering hieroglyphics which were previously impenetrable but I got the impression that there really is not all that much to say about it, which resulted in a book which frequently went off in tangents.

It started off well with an explanation of exactly what the stone is and how it was discovered and interpreted but the book then went on to provide a potted history of academic squabbles and egyptologists which I found to be rather tedious. Some of the material was barely relevant to the topic including a section on how Yuriy Knorozov decoded the Mayan script.

It was only towards the very end of the book that the narrative became a bit more interesting with a discussion of whether it would be appropriate to repatriate ancient artefacts to their countries of origin which was certainly relevant to the stone which was discovered in Egypt by the French and then acquired by British forces and eventually transferred to the British Museum in London where it has remained ever since.

On the whole, a disappointing book although those who are interested in the history of language decryption and egyptologists might find it rewarding. It does at least contain a reading list in the back if you wish to explore some of the topics referred to in the book further. Apr 27, Naomi Ruth rated it liked it Shelves: adult-fiction , non-fict , old-classic. The first few chapters dragged for me Maybe I've just heard the information one too many times.

Everything you ever wanted to know about the Rosetta Stone – The British Museum Blog

But as I had already read a linguistics point of view, a mythological point og view, and a philological, point of view, it was nice to have a history point of view too. And it was all worth it just for the one line that made me laugh out loud, which rarely happens when reading Egyptology books. It went along the lines of: "While trying to decipher a language without bilinguals in an unknown script, The first few chapters dragged for me It went along the lines of: "While trying to decipher a language without bilinguals in an unknown script, pray to God to be re-made as Michael Ventris.

Ancient Mysteries: The Rosetta Stone (History Documentary)

Love it. A good read. Nice because it was short and simple.

Rosetta Stone

A good historical aspect. Just prepare yourself for a lot of Champollion and Rosetta Stone madness. Nov 17, Heather Larcombe rated it liked it. I really should only listen to non-fiction and read fiction. I revert to high-point scanning when reading non-fiction, and that is an insult to the better books. This book is a lovely tour through history and biography, introducing the best characters of the Rosetta Stone's history.

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It also touches on a lot of other cryptographical excursions into history and how the lessons learned helped with hieroglyphics, too. Mar 25, John rated it really liked it Shelves: classical-studies. Another interesting short book approx. The stone, now known as the Rosetta Stone , would be the key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs. It would also land a place in the English language: Today, a search in a scientific journal database for "Rosetta Stone" yields many more metaphorical uses of the term than actual research on the Egyptian artifact.

Topics ranging from medical imaging, to black holes, to "intensional dynamic programming" it's an algorithm thing have been described as a "Rosetta Stone" by hopeful researchers looking for a breakthrough. So what made the Rosetta Stone so special? It wasn't the message it contained. According to the British Museum collections page, the find was part of a larger slab carved with a decree passed by a priestly council affirming Ptolemy V's success as a ruler in B.

Rather, what made the stone important was how this decree was written: first in Egyptian hieroglyphs ; then in demotic, another Egyptian script; and finally, again in ancient Greek.


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Contrary to the metaphors of Rosetta Stones as keys to a sudden breakthrough, though, this was a painstaking process that took nearly 20 years. The troops were part of Napoleon's Egyptian campaign, in which he temporarily conquered the country — and brought a bevy of scientists along who were eager to study what was to them unfamiliar land. The Rosetta Stone was one of the most important discoveries of the three-year campaign, and its ownership would become one of the key issues in the war. The soldiers who discovered the stone quickly reported it to Napoleon's scientific personnel in Cairo, according to " Cracking Codes: The Rosetta Stone and Decipherment " University of California Press, Immediately, the scientific community recognized the potential of the stone as a key to cracking the code of hieroglyphic writing.

As the French campaign in Egypt started to crumble — the British sent troops to push back as they tried to protect their own influence in the region — the possession of Egyptian antiquities became a sticking point between the two colonial powers. In , French Gen. Jacques-Francois de Menou held out in Alexandria and claimed that the Rosetta Stone was his personal property, in an attempt to ensure it remained in French hands, according to "Cracking Codes.

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Ultimately, the handover of the stone and other antiquities was negotiated between the British and the French, and by the terms of the Capitulation of Alexandria, the agreement that ended the French campaign, the Rosetta Stone ended up in British hands. Greek was known to be the administrative language of the Ptolemaic period, while demotic was used for daily writing and hieroglyphics were used for priestly missives.