I Am An Ant (God Books 4 Kids ! Book 3)

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When he accidentally stumbles onto a real film set, his special talent is suddenly revealed: when Hari dances, everyone has to join in. It makes him a local celebrity then, with the help of his friend Mr Ram, Hari uses his gift to spread happiness further afield. With his mother badly injured and in a coma he goes to stay with his uncle in his strange, crumbling house. Fast-moving, with a great sense of the natural world as well as hints at supernatural beings — good and bad — this is a thoroughly satisfying tale of young people saving the day.

Other authors creating addictive and irresistible page-turners for young readers include Steve Cole, Liz Pichon and Jim Smith. Jimmy is determined to follow his dream of a company run by kids for kids, despite the scepticism of parents, teachers and the bank. Maddy is a warm, thoroughly engaging central character, with just a touch of the Emma Woodhouse about her, and the ballet scenes will leave readers itching to stand at the barre. A different take on the football story, this is fun and easy to read, and the banter between George and her mates is top division stuff. But can he win over Miss Vowel, who seems to care more for her growing collection of school pets than any of her pupils?

Guy hascreated a wonderfully grotesque cast of characters, headed up of course by awful Aidan, for whom I have a ridiculous soft spot, horrid creature though he is. A special 15th anniversary edition of this award-winning classic adventure from Eva Ibbotson in which orphaned Maia travels from England to the Amazon with her governess. As the horror of that is sinking in, the situation gets even more frightening and he meets a dangerous girl who is able to control others with her thoughts.

Each title has a host of unique accessibility features to offer cracking reads to more children including reluctant and struggling readers and those with dyslexia or visual stress. Here at Lovereading4kids we are constantly selecting the best of their new and backlist titles to recommend to you. This time the Kidds are in Russia and hot on the trail of some missing masterpieces of the art world. Chapter are short but always full of action, and full of appealing illustrations too.

The Kidds are a fun bunch of people to spend time with and kid readers will feel well and truly part of the action. This is fiction to get even the most reluctant readers avidly turning the pages. Each child has an obvious revolting characteristic and each of their stories is hugely disgusting, richly inventive and cheeringly anarchic. Walliams has created a unique take on the classic cautionary tale. There is a huge emphasis on surreal humour in this book.

I hope children around the world will enjoy it, even the most reluctant reader. These stories are a joy and will have children everywhere reading all summer long. Only David Walliams could deliver such a wonderful book as such a terrific surprise. In a short book of less than 80 pages Malorie Blackman delivers an exciting, incisive story with a credible, interesting central character and powerful message about the importance of taking a stand and fighting for what you believe in. Michela travels through space with her people on an Alliance spaceship commanded by her mother.

Like all her friends she wears a Peace Maker non-aggression gadget. When an apparently hostile spaceship demands they put forward a champion or face destruction, Michela steps up, with surprising results. Exciting, thought-provoking stuff. The background is vividly described, and fascinating, whether you know your nunchaku from your shuriken or not, and Chris Bradford is an expert at keeping the tension high.

Everyone thinks they know what it's like, going to school. But have you ever wondered what life must be like at a boarding school? A school for young offenders? A school for the blind? With her trademark humour, insight, sensitivity and razor-sharp wit, Anne Fine explores these different worlds in a short story collection that will fascinate young readers.

Author: J. This large print, dyslexia-friendly edition of the most famous sports book in the wizarding world pairs J. Rowling's original text with gorgeous jacket art by Jonny Duddle and line illustrations throughout by Tomislav Tomic. This is a special large print edition of J. Full of magic and trickery, these classic tales both entertain and instruct, and remain as captivating to young wizards today as they were when Beedle first put quill to parchment in the fifteenth century. The boy at the centre of the story — we never learn his name — is poor, lonely and bullied by other children because of his selective mutism.

The dog he rescues from a car crash that has killed its owner is subject to its own set of painful compulsions, finding out why is one of the surprises and rewards of the story.

10 Children’s Books That Will Make Your Kids Feel Absolutely Loved

This will absorb readers, from the opening page to its warm, uplifting final line. His life is quite literally an uphill struggle, but his instinct to help others leads him to a healing bond with an extraordinary little dog and ultimately to find his voice again. He doggedly persists until he achieves his goals — working hard to understand what the little dog is trying to communicate to him. The final twist of the story highlights the lightness of touch and humour throughout.

A Different Dog draws on many experiences in these fields. And of course, it also draws on my own childhood. It was a matter of putting my hand into the lucky dip of my own mind. One of the influences on a writer would have to be the books that he or she has read themselves. But somewhere in the back of our minds are tucked the stories we have enjoyed in the past. Of the books that I loved when I was aged between thirteen and fifteen I can think of three which I turn back to and read again and again.

They are still readily available more than fifty years later. Teenagers and adults love these stories. I still have my old copies and like to look at their torn and worn covers which beckon me from years gone by. Here they are: Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. A boy and a runaway slave on the Mississippi River. How I wished I was on that raft. And little did I know that I would still be amazed by their wonderful adventures all these years later.

The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico. A girl, a bird and disabled man feature in this moving story. When you finish it you just know that there is an untold truth hinted at within the main story and it makes you think for weeks after you have read it. This is a lovely story about a boy, an old man and a fish.

I can tell you how I think A Different Dog came into being. When I was eight years old, I had to bury a dead dog. This unpleasant memory was the starting point for my new book. I began writing about how I felt while I was digging the grave for the poor animal. But as the story developed I dropped this bit out altogether and came up with a dog named Chase that was alive but very strange indeed. As the wrapping paper came off, something else revealed itself and the story changed completely.

It was not about death any more but had ended up being about … Well, what do you think? Paul Jennings, And a gun. With their lives now in danger, fearless Fran steps up and deploys immense nerve in an effort to extricate them from this hugely hazardous situation. The sharp, snappy style combined with criminal-themed content not forgetting the white-knuckle ride of an escape scene… put me in mind of Alex Rider, only with the action rooted around three small town heroes-next-door, rather than an international hi-tech hero.

It opens with a scene in which a young rook is attacked by a larger bird. Nicky and his younger brother Kenny save it. For all his nerve Nicky is vulnerable, and things could easily go wrong for him, instead they start to look up. Bit like us, eh? The follow up to Railhead, this is set in a gleaming future world where trains, great, beautiful sentient machines, travel from one world to the next. Romance is never far away either, not least the romance of travelling on beyond the sunset. Full of scenes and images that bring you up short, and driven by an unstoppable plotline, this is epic, dazzling stuff.

In Holes, best-selling author Louis Sachar showed his understanding and compassion for a group of boys who have got outside the system. Bradley seems unable to change but then Carla arrives. Carla believes in Bradley; gradually Bradley begins to believe in himself. Without preaching and with his familiar humour, Sachar tells a heartwarming story. Older brother Nicky narrates the story of the day he and his younger brother Kenny set out on a simple day out on the moors. Proposed by their father as a way of filling time while they wait nervously for their mum to return from her new life in Canada, it is meant to a fun day out tinged with a bit of nostalgia as they are retracing a walk that he used to enjoy.

But the simple walk which begins in a light hearted way soon becomes a deadly dangerous adventure as the weather conditions close in, the boys get completely lost and Kenny has to show exceptional courage and intelligence to make sure he can get Kenny home safely. Anthony McGowan maintains the intensity of the story throughout while also keeping the writing simple. May Book of the Month Interest Age Teen Reading Age 8 When a billionaire phone-tech entrepreneur challenges the Year Eleven pupils in her former school to switch off their phones for six weeks, Esther is determined to rise to the occasion.

Thought-provoking and topical, this pacey read is especially suitable for reluctant and dyslexic teen readers. June Book of the Month June Book of the Month In a nutshell: themes of fatherhood, memory and guilt explored in haunting YA novella Mal Peet, who died in , wrote with extraordinary sensitivity and insight and this novella, freshly published by Barrington Stoke, is testimony to his talent. Benjamin finds himself by accident outside his old home and revisits memories of the garden and treehouse that 20 years ago were such a key part of his childhood. His father built the treehouse for him but it quickly changed from being a place of shared stories to something less happy — a hideaway from his mother, a hiding place for his father as he turned away from the outside world.

The story is a painful one, years on Ben is still torn by conflicting loyalties, still angry with his father, still guilty for abandoning him. His return brings some new perspectives, but no happy resolution. There is so much depth and reality to the relationship between his characters; I hope to illustrate something of those spacious places he has created in between the lines. The huge, ancient beech tree at the centre of this story is a real treat for an illustrator. In a nutshell: football-set story, accessible to all readers Jackson Law is a talented footballer, newly signed to the United youth squad.

See a Problem?

An enjoyable and exciting contemporary story. Archie is devastated at the news his parents are splitting up. He and his dad are very close and when he realises that his father is leaving for another man — something his two sisters have already worked out — the shock has a physical impact. Archie has already been the victim of bullying and, perhaps to avoid a repeat, has become friends with the bullies at his new school; he is terrified of their reaction to the news. Annabel Pitcher portrays Archie with real insight and readers will understand completely the agony he feels.

She chooses to end the story in a supermarket where the aisles, through their very prosaic normality, open up a world of hope and new beginnings. Published by dyslexia specialists Barrington Stoke, this will be accessible to all readers and is worth recommending to all readers. Inspired by a passion to articulate the complex realities of life for teenagers — especially boys — around sexuality, loss, depression and family dynamics, Annabel has created an extraordinary narrator in Archie, a fabulous plotline and a cracking cast of characters as the story is propelled towards a remarkable final encounter.

As an ex-English teacher, I have seen first-hand how much these books mean to readers who long to access stories but are daunted by words. As a mum of two sons, it was interesting trying to get inside the head of a teenage boy. Beautiful full page illustrations by Alex T Smith send more shivers down the spine; one to read with all the lights on. Particularly suitable for struggling, reluctant and dyslexic teen readers.

Rock Wars is now at the halfway mark and only six bands remain. But there's plenty of music to face offstage as well as on. With one foot still in the school of hard knocks, and the other in hard rock heaven, singer Summer has to get herself back on track after being hit by a motorbike. With its heady mix of glamour and grit, and a cast of characters who run the gamut from smart, self-aware cynics to easily led-astrays, this is a seriously addictive read. Put on your finest threads and dive into the mosh pit of a plot that has more pace than a speed metal B-side!

Each has suffered heartache and each has experienced loss, yet dealt with it in very different ways. They meet in unusual circumstances and soon find themselves battling for their lives. The introduction set me on high alert, it took me a few seconds to understand what I was looking at, it was certainly intriguing and I immediately wanted to know more. Matt Dickinson doesn't shy away from difficult subjects, he exposes pain, corruption, loss, fear and meets them head on, yet with undeniable sensitivity.

Matt says: Yes, probably I am best known for my Everest adventures, but I have plenty of other themes that I want to explore. In my previous series Mortal Chaos, I based the stories around chaos theory and the chain reactions that cause disasters. With Lie Kill Walk Away I wanted to create a very different form of adventure, a thriller environment in which two teenage protagonists are trying, quite literally, to save the world.

We think this is great book for reluctant readers and Matt agrees.. Reluctant readers are often boys with short attention spans. I am the same in my reading habits; I strongly dislike books that are overwritten or just way too slow.

I can promise readers of Lie Kill Walk Away that they will be in for a very fast read. Having recently discovered that her dad is none other than global rockstar Johnny Jefferson, Jessie is settling in LA with Johnny and his new family. On her sixteenth birthday, Johnny springs an awesome surprise. There was a time when Luke Manchett was Mr Popular, but all that changed when he inherited a bunch of ghosts from his necromancer dad.

The central character Ant, imprisoned with her foster parents and little brother Mattie, is the kind of feisty, impulsive and courageous heroine who lights up the best YA. Longlisted for the UKLA Book Award Set in a near-future version of London, where a drug called Concentr8 has been extensively prescribed to young people diagnosed with ADHD, this is the brilliantly provocative second young adult novel from the bestselling author of Are You Experienced?

A political scandal unfolds when it emerges that not everyone was medically assessed before being put on the pacifying drug, suggesting that something far more sinister is going on. Told through several authentic first person narratives, and interspersed with revealing excerpts from medical reports, sociological texts and tweets, this gripping, politically-charged novel explores the big issue of how young people get lost and failed by society, and why they might turn to criminal and anti-social behaviour.

A fast-paced, thought-provoking rollercoaster of a read. As Maddie plans her pre-college summer vacation, her wealthy, flamboyant grandmother, Gram, drops a bombshell. Rather, this is a voyage for the dying and their loved ones, during which the passenger-patients aboard the good ship Wishwell will choose their time to be sent to sleep.

This remarkable debut is abundant in life lessons live to the full, be fearless, be forgiving but perhaps the most gorgeous message of all comes from Gram. Every bit as poignant on the subject of popping your clogs as it is on popping your cherry a summary I reckon straight-talking Gram would approve of , this book will make you laugh, cry and emerge from its pages feeling monumentally uplifted.

Ashley and Stewart are irresistible characters and this is set to become one of the most popular books of the year. Add to that the wider truths it tells us about power and injustice, and we have one of the greatest books of the twentieth century. Perfect for Reluctant Readers as well as keen readers. To view other titles we think are suitable for reluctant readers please click here. The experts at Barrington Stoke have put together a great guide with top tips to help you help your child to love reading - you can download it here.

Millions of books of all kinds from dealers all over the world, some not found in libraries. You should limit your search at least to Format:Book, and Audience:Juvenile. You can do this on the advanced search page or once you arrive at the results, using the left hand column, as with abe. Often you can find more about the content of a title by going to an individual library holding. Because you won't get as many duplicate titles, Worldcat works better for common titles than Abe or Amazon.

Pictures are best: Once you have narrowed down a possible title, try Amazon. The colour option on Google is working better and better. It's a real help. I have started using Images on bing. Look in the left hand column to limit your search to these. A few words can help: If all you can remember is a few words, try Google. Put the words in quotes. Use only one or two, essential, easily-spelled, keywords. Selling One or Two Books. Probably the easiest place for an individual to sell books like those above is on Amazon. Look up your book, click on the picture, then look in the blue box for "Have one to sell?

If, and only if, Amazon has listed the book in the past, will you be able to list also. Ebay is also very easy and inexpensive to use for a few books and it allows you more room to describe the books. For pricing your book, it is easier and more accurate to use the Abebooks. Then double check on Amazon because prices there are sometimes higher.

Amazon's Search is really not set up for out of print books. The more care you put into describing your books, the more likely you are to sell them.

How to Find That Book You've Spent Years Looking For

Note: We do not purchase books online, sight unseen. Please do not offer them to us. Thank you. Finding and Valuing an Older Book.


  • Symptoms of Death (Dr. Alexandra Gladstone Book 1);
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Our email address is on the Contact Us page. We do not run a formal Book Search and we will not order books for you, but we'll try to point you in the right direction. We never value a book over the net, nor do other reputable booksellers. If you have an older book which seems to have value, you might want to look at our page Buying and Selling Children's Books.


  • What are the best children's books on the second world war?.
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  • 16 Children's Books For 'Spiritual But Not Religious' Families | HuffPost.
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Look through the suggestions below. If the process seems too complicated, we are pleased to recommend an very experienced children's specialist bookseller who does formal book searches and keeps a want list for customers. Your estimate as to the range of possible publication dates. An older family book? Separate plates or in text? Other illustrators the pictures call to mind? Choose your search words carefully: Unusual words really help: wallaby works better than bear as a search word.

See also our Links for Collectors in the Collector's Corner. Guidelines: This forum is monitored by the owner of this site, Old Children's Books. Only a few book sleuths are whitelisted on this forum. All other p ending posts are reviewed individually and approved at least daily. No sales offers, please. Many, many thanks to all the wonderful readers who help to ID these books!

We also appreciate those who take the time to thank the contributors for researching their books. Possibly Italian? Two children a boy and an older girl live in a wealthy estate with a large checkered lawn. They both like to play on the lawn with a red ball I can't remember how they get the ball. They're both warned never to go through the hedge. A grey dwarf like man is involved somehow. The red ball eventually gets thrown accidentally through a hole in the hedge, and the boy climbs after and is abducted by the grey man, who turns him to stone and puts him in his tower which is full of 99 other stone children.

The girl goes on a quest, visiting the sky queen and the ground king, who both ask her to do some kind of task before giving her something in return. She spends the night in the woods, having gathered firewood during the day, within a protective circle with a fire. The grey man tries to tempt her out. I can't remember if she resists or not.

Somehow she defeats the grey man and all the children are turned back to normal. This wonderful story was first published in the St. Nicholas magazine in We have both versions in stock and I would be happy to send you a jpg if you think this is the one. I can't remember what the book was called or who it was by but it was a children's book about to young girls under the age of five that end up walking to the park from their house without their mother knowing.

I had it read to me in the early 90s. Though I have a feeling it might not have had text possibly just pictures. The story is based around a young boy who comes into possession of a number of animals like tiger, camel, yak etc. Rather than keep them he embarks on a journey to return each of the animals to its country of origin. During the story he also describes some of the culture of the country. If you have any idea on the title of the book i would be most appreciative. One of my friends is looking for a book from his childhood.

It's about a boy who uses shoe boxes to build homes for animals in the forest to protect them from a storm. That's all he remembers. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. My mum was telling me about a book she wanted as a girl. She had read a book called Mouse, and badly wanted Older Mouse and never got it.

She's 80 now, and I'd love to find it for her. I'm afraid I don't have any other details, but here's hoping! This teenage girl decides to babysit this bad kid that everyone warns her about-the kid likes to bite I beleive it was a story that was combined with several other short stories I remember a book from the late 80's 's about a girl who is not supposed to go into the forest but goes further and further to get the pretty flowers.

She keeps saying she will only get a few more but the further she goes the prettier they get. Finally she has to run home because the monster in the woods chased her home, like her mother warned her about. I always loved and once memorized this book.

Then She Surprised Me

The copy I have lacks cover and first few pages. It must have come from a 'dime store', or grocery rack, and started out: "Poppy was a fairy, a four inch fairy who lost her way in the world of people. She did not know how she got there, but she awakened one morning in the toe of a slipper". It was read to me, then I read and reread this, read it to each child I baby sat with and to the campers where I was counselor, and my children.

I found an abreviated copy in the 's which was a poor substitute for it. Mine came from the early 's. This would be a dream come true to find it again. There are some on abe from , the edition we have had, but the first edition seems to be scarce. The early ones are expensive, but you could probably get one for less eventually on ebay.

Leave a want. Perhaps you could purchase a very beat up one with the front intact and combine the two books. I am looking for a children's bookI think it is called "The Big Fish". It is about a boy and his father and something about canoeing. An illustration I remember in the book is the father and the boy carrying the canoe over their heads. It has a picture on every or almost every page and everything is in black and white. I cannot find it anywhere on any search engine.

The book was a compilation of stories. I remember I loved the illustrations in this book, particularly this story. If ou have any suggestions, that would be fantastic. Not sure when the book was published, but was before the 90s. Very short book. Only part I remember is a quote "when God made dogs, He made dogs. I remember a book I had in the 60's that looked like Barbie and she shrunk down and had to find a frog to help her.

It was a large picture book. I only remember bits and pieces of the pictures. I remember her shrinking and her clothes being too big and then of her meeting a toad. Woul dappreciate any help been trying to remember it for years. This book was a large hard covered book that was well illistrated with a lot of short stories aboutbgiants and woodcuts out witting the bad giant etc..

Early 's at school, 3 or 4 book series about a Futuristic Industrial tyrannical World where the equivalent of 'Gladiators' fought to the death in arena's. I think in groups of upto 3 or 4, might have been solo. I think the lead character Vado, Varga, Vardo something like this wishes to be more, escapes etc. That or he was simply proud of his winning to better improve the faction he was loyal to. Books where 7x5inch soft back, very colorful with one I think having a Grilled Masked type figure holding his gauntleted hand with spikes up.

I posted below, it's a coming of age story about a teenager who works for some place on the beach and lives behind or near an abandoned Carasouel his Uncle or father left him. These books showcase the diverse ways people of all ages and races have engaged in anti-racist activism, and highlight how race intersects with other issues, such as capitalism, class and colonization. The majority of books center activists of color, whose lives and bodies have been on the front lines of racial justice work, yet whose stories often go untold.

But first, he was a boy named Malcolm Little. Written by his daughter, this inspiring picture book biography celebrates a vision of freedom and justice. Bolstered by the love and wisdom of his large, warm family, young Malcolm Little was a natural born leader. He had to learn how to be strong and how to hold on to his individuality.

He had to learn self-reliance. Ages 6— Harriet Tubman helped hundreds of enslaved people escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Ages 6—9. Military Academy, home to the better-equipped West Points Cadets. Sportswriters billed the game as a sort of rematch, pitting against each other the descendants of U.

Board of Education , Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. Her parents took action by organizing the Latinx community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California. Learn about what exactly happened there, and why. Ages 3—8. There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you. There are many reasons to feel different. And that sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway.

Ages 4—8. Where is our historian to give us our side? Arturo asked. A century later, his groundbreaking collection, known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, has become a beacon to scholars all over the world. Ages 9— After settling into a main floor seat, an usher came by and told her to move, because her ticket was only good for the balcony.

Ages 5—9. Using the beautiful garden in the backyard as a metaphor, Miss Tillie shows Mackenzie that maintaining healthy hair is not a chore nor is it something to fear. Most importantly, Mackenzie learns that natural Black hair is beautiful. Ages 5—8. Lena Horne was born into the freedom struggle, to a family of teachers and activists. But the roles she was considered for were maids and mammies, stereotypes that Lena refused to play.

Still, she never gave up. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite being told to do otherwise. When she goes home for summer holidays, her parents decide never to send her away again, but where will she hide and what will happen when her parents disobey the law? Ages 7— Includes an extensive Note to Parents and Caregivers with guidelines for discussing race and racism with children, child-friendly definitions, and sample dialogues. Performing catapulted her all the way to the stages of s Broadway where she inspired everyone from songwriters to playwrights.

Yet with all her success, she knew firsthand how prejudice shaped her world and the world of those around her. As a result, Florence chose to support and promote works by fellow Black performers while heralding a call for their civil rights. Ages 3—7. Integral to the Freedom Summer of , Ms. In the early s, few African Americans could afford to buy cars, so this would be an adventure. Many hotels and gas stations refused service to Black people.